“I’m not going to raise my kids the way my parents raised me”

We’ve all heard people, including me, say “I’m raising my kids differently” or “I’m never going to raise my kids the way my parents raised me”. I hear that all the time. But, have you ever heard someone say “I’m going to raise my kids just like my parents raised me”.

I doubt it.

I’ve never heard anyone mouthed those words.

I think it’s because we as a society often focus on all the negative ways in which our parents raised us, recalling all the drama and trauma that afflicted us. And in reaction to that trauma, we announce that we will behave differently, raise our kids differently. For example, if often goes like this: someone was abused (physically or emotionally) by their parent and then take every measure to ensure that they do not abuse their child. Or someone felt that their parents hovered over them too much, controlled every element of their life; and as a result, they create a house in which liberty exists, a sense of freedom.  In a way, that’s great — the next generation reaps those benefits. But still, it’s an act in opposition.

But what about passing on positive life lessons that we want to pass on? The good stuff that we want to continue ?

Disabling remote loading of images (in e-mails)

On both my laptop and iPhone, I’ve configured my e-mail clients to disable a setting called “Load Remote Images.”  Although there are a number of benefits in doing so, like reducing network traffic (i.e. bandwidth), my main motivation is this: preventing senders from tracking my e-mail behavior, preventing them from identifying whether or not I’ve open their e-mails.  When loading an image, the e-mail client sends an HTTP request to URL defined for the image(s). This, coupled with the the sender’s ability to craft a unique URL for each image, enables them to check the server’s access logs. In short, it answers the question: “Did they open up my e-mail?”

Am I paranoid? Perhaps. Is it over the top? Maybe. But allow me provide you a screenshot (below) of an e-mail that I recently received from The Everygrey, an awesome (daily) newsletter sent out to those interested in what’s going on in Seattle.

Touch base e-mail from Everygrey
Touch base e-mail from Everygrey

Despite the above e-mail, I’d like to mention that actually read their e-mails. Every day. But without loading of remote images (as well as not clicking on the links embedded in the e-mail), they can only assume that I’m an inactive user, which obviously isn’t the case.  And although I’ve used them as example, I’m actually defending against more nefarious senders.

Dog palace

On Saturday, just before the sun began to rise, Jess and I began loading our luggage into black Mazda hatchback for our Christmas trip from Seattle to Los Angeles. Normally, when packing, we haphazardly shove our suit cases into the trunk and squeeze bags between the front and back seats. But this year, we decided to leverage the installed roof rack, purchasing a black cargo bag capable of storing up to 15 cubic feet.

 

Roof rack from Amazon basics
Roof rack from Amazon basics

Storing all our luggage — two ukuleles, a carry on suit case, Christmas presents for family, dry freezed raw dog food-— overhead freed up the entire rear of the car, allowing Jess to set up what she calls the dog palace:

Metric sprawled out in the dog palace
Metric sprawled out in the dog palace